Meditation

IMG_3286Meditation pageGROUP CLASSES | INDIVIDUAL CLASSES

Meditation practice will transform your life. The practice of meditation is to retrain and transform the mind, release us from attachment, help us uncover our innate nature. The path begins with concentration (samatha) meditation, to calm the mind and continues with the cultivation of penetrating reality with insight (vipassana) meditation. Ultimately the two are united, the truth arises, attachments released and the mind is transformed.

Margaret teaches Meditation Classes in two formats:
1. Individual, one-on-one, or to
2. Group, created by a group of colleagues or friends.

• All classes are pre-arranged with Margaret. Please contact Margaret to discuss setting up a class.
• Classes are held at The Insight Center or via Skype. Off-sight classes are taught for an additional fee.  Please inquire with Margaret.

All classes are four-week sessions, Meditation l and Meditation ll:
1. Meditation l: Concentration (Samatha) Meditation and Spiritual Practices, teaching the daily practice of concentration meditation. After completion of this course you may progress to
2. Meditation ll: Insight (Vipassana) Meditation and Spiritual Practices.

These classes are described below:

Meditation l: Concentration (Samatha) Meditation and Spiritual Practices teaches the daily practice of concentration meditation. After completion of this course you may progress to Meditation ll: Insight (Vipassana) Meditation and Spiritual Practices.

Meditation l: Concentration (Samatha) Meditation and Spiritual Practices

Concentration meditation using concentration practice must come first. One-pointed concentration of the breath is used to develop the mind’s inherent stability, clarity and strength. It is with this practice that we learn to calm the mind.

This is a four-week course designed to teach you concentration meditation. At the completion of this course you will have the knowledge and experience to maintain an effective concentration meditation practice. This course if open to all and can be repeated as many times as a student desires for support as they continue to practice.

  1. Introduction to Concentration Meditation
  2. Progressive Stages of Concentration Meditation/Buddhism 101
  3. Effects and Hindrances of Concentration Meditation
  4. Deepening Concentration Practice/Chakras and Auras

Meditation ll: Insight (Vipassana) Meditation and Spiritual Practices

Insight meditation is an extension of concentration practice. Insight (Vipassana) means, “to clear the mind”. After we have learned to calm the mind with concentration meditation we can learn to cultivate moment-to-moment awareness and gain insights into our inner self.

Insight (Vipassana) Meditation is the oldest of Buddhist practices. The method comes directly from the Satipatthana Suttra, a discourse attributed to the Buddha himself. Insight (Vipassana) Meditation is a direct and gradual cultivation of mindfulness/awareness. It proceeds piece by piece over a period of years. Our attention is directed to an intense examination of our existence. With this practice we advance to understand the truths about non-ego, emptiness, nothingness, peace and joy by seeing our issues and letting them go.

This four-week course is designed for students who have completed Meditation l, are comfortable with their concentration meditation practice and ready to learn Insight (Vipassana) Meditation practice.

  1. Vipassana Meditation, Introduction to Insight Practice
  2. Vipassana Meditation and Mindfulness
  3. Vipassana Meditation/Energy Healing Practices
  4. Challenges that arise with Vipassana practice

“When we question ego-mind directly, it is exposed for what it is: the absence of everything we believe it to be. We can actually see through this seemingly solid ego-mind, or self. But what are we left with then? We are left with an open, intelligent awareness, unfettered by a self to cherish or protect. This is the primordial wisdom mind of all beings. Relaxing into this discovery is true meditation—and true meditation brings ultimate realization and freedom from suffering.” Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche, “Searching for Self” (Tricycle, Summer 2007)

“It is to untangle that we begin meditation practice. To disentangle ourselves, to be free, requires that we train our attention.” Pg. 6 Seeking the Heart of Wisdom, The Path of Insight Meditation, Joseph Goldstein and Jack Kornfield

“Meditation has to do with opening what is closed in us, balancing what is reactive, and exploring and investigating what is hidden.” Pg. 15 Seeking the Heart of Wisdom, The Path of Insight Meditation, Joseph Goldstein and Jack Kornfield

“Meditation practice helps us relinquish old, painful habits; it challenges our assumptions about whether or not we deserve happiness. (We do, it tells us emphatically.) It also ignites a very potent energy in us. With a strong foundation in how to practice meditation, we can begin to live in a way that enables us to respect ourselves, to be calm rather than anxious, and to offer caring attention to others instead of being held back by notions of separation.” Sharon Salzberg

“We do Samatha meditation so we can achieve the power to let go.” Dzongar Jamyang Khyentse Rinpoche, Tricycle, Winter, 2009

“The biggest and toughest questions of life cannot be answered by second hand knowledge or intellectual ways of understanding. There is a way to answer these difficult and wonderful questions. What is love? What is freedom? Why is there suffering in the world? They are answered by an intuitive, silent knowing, by developing our own capacity to see clearly and directly.”

“Meditation has to do with opening what is closed in us, balancing what is reactive, and exploring and investigating what is hidden.” Pg. 15 Seeking the Heart of Wisdom, the Path of Insight Meditation, Joseph Goldstein and Jack Kornfield